Illness & Injury

equine pre-purchase exam, how to buy a horse, how to exam a horse for purchase, horse pre-purchase exam, selling a horse pre-purchase exam, pre-purchase vet check horse

The pre-purchase examination, or “vetting” of a horse, can be a stressful time for buyer and seller alike. On one hand, the seller may be anxious that something undesirable will be discovered, leading to the end of the sale. On the other hand, the potential buyer fears the heartbreak that will result if their new dream horse fails the dreaded vet check. However, a clear understanding of the purpose of this essential veterinary service will help alleviate tensions leading up to the big day.

A new review published in The Veterinary Journal demonstrates how research led by the University of Liverpool has changed the way we think about a crippling disease of horses.

A new gene therapy shows promise for treating tendon injuries according to a report published in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science. The authors claim the technique gives much faster healing than current methods and could significantly reduce relapse rates.

Racehorses need their breath to run their best. But inflammatory airway disease (IAD) can rob them of their stamina. New research in the Ontario Veterinary College at the University of Guelph shows the disease is much more common than previously thought.

Researchers at the University of Guelph are searching for clues to better manage a virus that can cause late gestation abortion in mares. Horses carrying equine herpesvirus (EHV) may exhibit signs as minor as a runny nose and mild fever, but the virus is a major cause of neurological, respiratory, and reproductive disease, including abortions, in the equine industry.

Equine Sports Therapy, Alexa Linton, equine cranial bones, equine skull

The equine skull has thirty-four bones, while the human skull is made up of twenty-two bones of which eight are cranial bones and fourteen are facial bones. That is quite a number of bones making up our noggins and those of our horses. But what do they all do? That’s a great question with a complex answer.

equine respiratory ailments, horse barn air quality, horse care, horse barn drainage, horse barn ventilation, equine respiratory system, horse bedding

Horses are naturally designed to live outside. With shelter from the wind and elements and access to fresh water and good quality hay, most horses can live quite comfortably surrounded by their companions without a stable. This is not always a convenient option for their human counterparts.

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Riding Vactions in California with Jec Ballou